Thursday, July 25, 2019

What Are You Reading?

It's Thursday! I have a couple meetings, so I might have to catch up today, but I'm always interested in what you are all reading.

I'm reading the 28th book in one of my favorite series, Heather Graham's Krewe of Hunters books. The Seekers is set in an old inn and tavern, halfway between Harrisburg and Philadelphia. It's the second in what I'm guessing is Graham's latest trilogy featuring a couple of the same characters. The third book, The Stalking, is due out in two months, so I won't have long to wait. Enough about my obsession. I know Jeff's wife, Jackie, is a fan.

So, what are you reading this week? Let's catch up with your books.

25 comments:

SandyG265 said...

I read KILLER IN THE CARRIAGE HOUSE by Sheila Connolly. I should have listened to you Lesa and skipped this one.

MURDER ON THE BREWSTER FLATS by Aaron Lazar. The story was to unbelievable for me.

JANE DARROWFIELD, PROFESSIONAL BUSYBODY by Barbara Ross. I like her Maine Clambake series better. I just didn’t feel any connection to a batch of seniors in a retirement community

THIRTY-THREE DAYS by Stephen B King is a time travel romance about a chain of people who go back into the past to save the world from starvation.

SILVER IN THE WOOD by Emily Tesh is a short fantasy book based on the Greenman myth.

Jeff Meyerson said...

She is indeed, Lesa, though she is still a few trilogies behind. I will tell her about the new one. Right now she is trying to get through Chuck Wendig's WANDERERS before it has to go back to the library (can't renew it) on Monday.

I'm reading Wendig's BLACKBIRDS, first in his Miriam Black series, and talk about dark! Miriam Black has the ability (she considers it a curse) to touch a person (skin to skin) and see how and when they are going to die. Since this is a six book series I am curious to see where he goes with it. It is certainly a fast (did I say "dark" enough?) read.

Also reading Peter Orner's latest short story collection, MAGGIE BROWN & OTHERS. As usual, most of these are quite short. I like his writing.

Up next is the new Linda Castillo (SHAMED) and an old Donald Westlake humorous book that I missing (THE SPY IN THE OINTMENT).

This week I finished LAST CAR OVER THE SAGAMORE BRIDGE by Peter Orner and HUNTING GROUND, the third K-9 mystery by Margaret Mizushima. I will get to the fourth (my library seems to have them all as ebooks) before the fifth comes out in November.

Patricia Stoltey said...

I just started Dead Stop by Barbara Nickless, which is a K-9 series featuring a gal who's ex-Marine and now a railroad cop and her ex-Marine dog Clyde.

Margie Bunting said...

The second in the Countess of Harleigh Mysteries, A LADY’S GUIDE TO GOSSIP AND MURDER by Dianne Freeman, is a light Victorian cozy that I found less impressive than the first in the series. The young widowed countess, Frances Wynn, again joins with her wannabe paramour, George Hazelton, to solve the murder of an also-widowed friend. Mary has been keeping track of the seamy side of aristocracy and threatening to release this unsavory information to the public. Another murder ensues, and Frances's cousin Charles, who had a brief romance with Mary, is a person of interest in both murders. I like the characters and setting, but the story got bogged down a bit for me.

Not really a sequel, THE BOOKSHOP ON THE SHORE has a couple of previously-seen Jenny Colgan characters. But the focus is on Zoe, who moves from London to rural Scotland to support herself and her son when Hari's father is mostly absent and not financially supportive. Hari is a happy 4-year-old, but he has never spoken a word. One of Zoe's jobs is as a live-in au pair to three unruly children in the town's biggest house. The children have lost their mother, and their father has lost all control over them. The other job is to help her pregnant friend Nina with her traveling bookshop until the baby comes. Neither job is as easy as Zoe had hoped, and her baby daddy is as problematic as ever. But Zoe finds she has strengths and talents she didn't know she had, and Hari flourishes with his new "family." I wouldn't count this book as one of Colgan's very best, but every Colgan book is a comforting, uplifting read for me.

In TIME AFTER TIME by Lisa Grunwald, the story of Joe, a railroad employee working at Grand Central Terminal and Nora, a young woman he meets there who is wearing an anachronistic flapper dress, spans more than ten years, starting in 1937 when the terminal was in its heyday. Nora was killed in a train wreck inside the terminal in 1925, she is somehow able to appear at the site of the crash at odd times--not every year and for varying lengths of time--but she never seems to age. And she is not a specter, but a woman who can interact physically and verbally with humans. Joe starts a relationship with Nora that is highly romantic (and highly improbable) and that begs to be made into a movie. Even with the magical realism aspect, it is a story told in an old-fashioned way, which seems appropriate. I can't say much more because I don't want to give anything away. You should discover it for yourself. I enjoyed it.

BORROWED TIME by Tracy Clark is the second book in the Chicago Mystery series, featuring Cass Raines, cop turned PI. A delivery guy at Cass's local diner asks her to investigate his friend's supposed suicide by drowning. Tim was from a wealthy family and terminally ill, and his friend is convinced he didn't commit suicide. Cass's exuberant investigation style puts her in danger at every turn, and even Tim's family blocks her progress. The plot takes twists and turns that you won't expect. Highly recommended.

Lesa said...

Well, darn, Sandy. Actually, I was hoping I was wrong about the Sheila Connolly book. I'm sorry I was right.

Lesa said...

Jeff, I recommended the Wanderers book to my nephews after your comments about it. Fortunately, I have an ARC, and I'm sending it home with their mother next week. Thanks for the tip.

Lesa said...

Seem to be quite a few K-9 series right now, Patricia. You'll have to let us know how that one is.

Lesa said...

Margie, Every one of those books is on one TBR pile or another at my place. Thank you!

Mark Baker said...

Earlier this week, I finished PENNE DREADFUL by Catherine Bruns. This was my first by her. I had a couple of issues with it, but overall I enjoyed it.

Now I’m working on LOVE AND DEATH AMONG THE CHEETAHS by Rhys Bowen, which is fun as always.

Lesa said...

Mark, Have you read Bree Baker's books? I really like that series featuring a tea shop. Live and Let Chai was the first one.

Sharon said...

This week I finished DEATH AND OTHER HAPPY ENDINGS by Melanie Cantor. I wasn't sure at first but I am glad I stuck with it until the end. It was a pleasant easy read.

Then I read THE BOOKISH LIFE OF NINA HILL by Abbi Waxman. I absolutely loved the discussion of books (who could not love a character who plans her Thursday evenings just for reading)and the different book clubs. I even liked how Nina met her family. But there were parts I felt I could have done without and basically were TMI. It was good but definitely the must read summer book that so many lists have it on for me.

Today I start THE PEACOCK SUMMER by Hannah Richell. I hope to get back to mysteries soon. I have both PENNE DREADFUL and LOVE AND DEATH AMONG THE CHEETAHS on reserve at the library.

Happy reading!

Margie Bunting said...

Sharon, I am taking The Bookish Life of Nina Hill with me this weekend to South Lake Tahoe, where we will have a nice 4-day family vacation. I don't know how much I will be able to read with my grandchildren around, but it looks like a fun read. Thanks for the warning about TMI. I've never read anything by Abbi Waxman before so I'm curious about it.

I also have a hold on Rhys Bowen's new Lady Georgie book--can't wait! I just picked up the new David Rosenfelt book and a few others that have been on a lot of lists, so I have some pleasant reading times ahead.

Sharon said...

Margie, I will be interested in your thoughts. Overall, I liked it. I don't think I was the target audience with some of it especially Chapter 5.

Lesa said...

Sharon & Margie, That's another book I have on a TBR pile. I'll keep what you said in mind, Sharon. I'll be interested in your thoughts, too, Margie.

Margie Bunting said...

Sharon, now you have me really intrigued--chapter 5, hmmmmm . . .

Mindy said...

Peach Cobbler Murder by Joanne Fluke

Gram said...

I just finished The Summoning by Heather Graham - the 1st in this trilogy and am looking forward to the next two. It took me a while to get into this one and if it had been a new to me author I probably would not have kept on. Since it was Graham's Krewe I continued and enjoyed the book!

Jeff Meyerson said...

If we're talking K-9 mysteries, let me also recommend:

Robert Crais, SUSPECT
Paula Munier, A BORROWING OF BONES (second in series coming in November)

Lesa said...

Mindy, I hope you enjoyed Joanne Fluke's book.

Lesa said...

Gram,

That's funny. I finished The Seekers, and review it on Saturday. Even though it starts dramatically, it took me a little while to get into this one. But, I really liked it by the time I finished.

Lesa said...

Suspect, Jeff. I need to read that sometime. I have the ARC of Paula Munier's new book, and I'm looking forward to it.

Glen Davis said...

I read:

The MLJ Companion; about Archie Comics Superheroes.

Odd In by Michael Crichton writing as John Lange; One of his early potboilers. This one about a heist that goes wrong.

Rules of War by Matthew Betley; Logan West and Co pursues the Organization in Venezuela, while the Organization pursues them.

Stone Mothers by Erin Kelly; A perhaps too British Psychological Thriller.

St. Louis Noir; One of those collections that seem to be all over. This one read like a bunch of people who went to the same creative writing workshop. The best stories are old fashioned O. Henry type stuff. Should have called Charles Colyott for something different.

Tahoe Payback by Todd Borg; Owen Jagger delves deep into the charity racket to solve some murders. The racket is scarier than the murders, as the victims really had it coming.

Lesa said...

Well, good, Glen. I never feel bad when the victims deserve it. I know I should, but I don't. Yes, they've put those Noir novels all over the place. They always seem to be a little uneven in quality, though.

Mark Baker said...

I have not read the Bree Baker series, but it is on my list. Something about the name attracted me. :)

I believe it is the same author as the Christmas Tree Farm mysteries. There were two from Crooked Lane written under the name Jacqueline Frost. I think she has a new series coming from Kensington as well. The first is Apple Cider Slaying and is being written under her real name - Julie Anne Lindsey.

Glen Davis said...

I got it in a trade. I also came into Milwaukee Noir. I'll get to it eventually.