Thursday, April 18, 2019

What Are You Reading?

I don't have a book to talk about since I'm finishing up my books for deadline. So, let's talk about your books. What are you reading this week?

25 comments:

Jeff Meyerson said...

Now that I finally finished SHE's LEAVING HOME by William Shaw, which I certainly liked enough to go on to the next in the series, I am halfway through the fast-moving Aussie thriller, RESURRECTION BAY by Emma Viskic. PI Caleb Zelic (in Melbourne) is deaf, which makes it hard to keep up with what people are saying - he reads lips most of the time. When his best childhood friend, who was helping him on a case, is brutally murdered, he is determined to find the killer.

Short story read is Peter Lovesey's THE CRIME OF MISS OYSTER BROWN and Other Stories, originally published in England 25 years ago but only making it here now, thanks to Crippen & Landru. Very good.

Sharon said...

This week I read THE PLOT IS MURDER by V. M. Burns. Thank you Lesa for introducing me to this author! I was not sure which part of the story I enjoyed more, the book Samantha was writing or the mystery itself. I am looking forward to reading the remainder of the series.

Now I am reading THE FIFTEEN WONDERS OF DANIEL GREEN the debut novel by Erica Boyce. Daniel belongs to a secret organization that makes crop circles at night. He is hired by a farmer in Vermont who is very ill to make a circle to bring attention to their small town. It is told in alternating chapters from the perspective of Daniel, the farmer's wife and the farmer's daughter. So far I am enjoying it because it is different. The author recommends checking out Circlemakers.org to learn more about crop circles.

Happy Reading!

Lesa said...

Jeff, I'm not even going to look up William Shaw or Resurrection Bay (that second one sounds interesting). I don't need another series!

Lesa said...

You're welcome, Sharon. I'm liking the book Samantha is writing! It's just as good in the second book.

SandyG265 said...

I finished PRUNING THE DEAD by Julia Henry. It was an appropriate book for the season since I’m getting my garden beds ready for planting.

CHOCOLATE CREAM PIE MURDER by Joanne Fluke. Every time I read one of these I say I’m done with this series but I read this one anyway. At least it was a library book.

WIRED: AN UNLIKELY DOCTOR, A BRAVE AMPUTEE, AND THE MEDICAL MIRACLE THAT MADE HISTORY by Dr. Ajay K. Seth. It’s about a doctor from a small town who preformed the first surgery in the US that allowed an amputee to feel touch on the fingers of a prosthetic arm. It was well written and didn’t go overboard on the surgical details.

Lesa said...

Sandy, I love your comment about Chocolate Cream Pie Murder that at least it was a library book. Funny!

Margie Bunting said...

Hello, all. I was on babysitting duty out of town (all survived) for part of last week, but I'm back with more brief reviews.

I tried to read Lisa See's THE ISLAND OF SEA WOMEN so I could attend our local B&N book club, but I gave up after 200 pages or so. It was getting too graphically violent, including torture, and I couldn't stomach it. It was quite slow as well, but I did enjoy the historical details about the women divers of Jeju (Korea).

I know several of you (including Lesa) have read Deanna Raybourn's A DANGEROUS COLLABORATION, which I thoroughly enjoyed. The Veronica Speedwell Mystery series just keeps getting better.

David Rosenfelt's latest Doug Brock thriller, BLACK AND BLUE, is a fast-paced book featuring a rash of murders that all seem to point to one person. Doug is still struggling with partial amnesia after a previous injury and hopes that a suspect in a murder 18 months ago isn't the culprit because that might mean the more recent murders could have been prevented. I loved the short chapters, which kept me reading on and on (I finished in a day), the twisty plot, Rosenfelt's trademark sly humor, and the lack of graphic violence. Andy Carpenter, the lawyer who has his own long-running Rosenfelt series, has a cameo, which was fun.

I think BLOOD OATH is one of Linda Fairstein's best books in her long-running series about Asst. DA Alexandra Cooper, who has just returned from leave after being kidnapped during her last investigation with the Manhattan Sex Crimes Unit. Her new case is complicated by allegations of misconduct by one colleague, an insidious attack on another, and the mysterious goings-on inside a prestigious research institute. As always, she interacts with NYPD detectives, one her lover.

In Amanda Flower's latest Amish Candy Shop Mystery, PREMEDITATED PEPPERMINT, it's Christmastime in Harvest, Ohio. Bailey King is upset when her ex-boyfriend, celebrity chocolatier Eric, turns up in town, trying to rekindle their relationship while shooting a holiday special partly in Bailey's Amish grandmother's sweet shop. Of course, there is quickly a dead body--this time it's Eric's show's executive producer--and Eric is a suspect. In the meantime, Bailey's relationship with deputy Aiden is developing. There are also appearances by Aiden's mother's mini-pet pig, Bailey's best friend and fellow chocolatier, and a cavalcade of both Amish and Englischer town denizens. And Bailey just may be offered a show of her own, which will require her to spend time back in NYC. It's a fun, quick read.

It's been many years since I read a Carol Goodman novel, but I may have to look for more. THE NIGHT VISITORS keeps you reading on as the suspense builds and culminates in a satisfying (and thoughtful) conclusion. Alice and 10-year-old Oren are on the run from an abusive and threatening man, and they are taken in by Mattie, who founded the Sanctuary agency for the victims of domestic violence and who has some troubling secrets in her own past as well.She is drawn especially to Oren, who reminds her of her brother, who died at Oren's current age. Both boys found their obsession with Star Wars both exciting and comforting. There is a whiff of the supernatural in the story as well. This is an easy read, well written and thought-provoking. Thank you, Kathy Boone Reel, for the recommendation.

Sharon, I just found the Daniel Green book on the shelf at the library, so I look forward to hearing how you liked it after you finish. Jeff, Resurrection Bay sounds awesome. I may have to look for that one, although I agree with Lesa that I already have enough books to read!

Mark Baker said...

Yesterday, I finished LIGHTS! CAMERA! PUZZLES! by Parnell Hall. I freely admit this series is an acquired taste. Either you enjoy them or you don’t. When they are in, I love the word play and verbal sparring between the characters. However, I still felt this was a weaker entry in the series.

Today, I’ll be starting STAGING IS MURDER by Grace Topping.

Jeff Meyerson said...

The sequel to RESURRECTION BAY, AND FIRE CAME DOWN, is already available as well. And I picked up the newest Peter Robinson book (finally), CARELESS LOVE, at the library this morning.

Lesa said...

Margie, You managed a great deal of reading even though you were babysitting! Young enough for naps and early bedtimes, I'm thinking.

Your summaries are as good as, or better than mine, so I always enjoy reading your comments about the books. I tend to read Linda Fairstein's books if I'm interested in the setting. I loved the one set in Grand Central Terminal, although there really was more history than mystery in that one.

And, I agree. Deanna Raybourn continues to get better.

Lesa said...

Mark, I think you're right about Parnell Hall's Puzzle Lady mysteries. I don't think I ever acquired the taste.

Lesa said...

Well, Jeff, I may just have to try Resurrection Bay.

Charlotte said...

Lesa and everyone who share on this blog I truly hope it will be a blessed weekend for each one of you.

🌺🌸💐

Lesa said...

Thank you, Charlotte. I hope you have a blessed weekend as well. I'm so glad you drop in on Thursdays to say hi. Hugs, my friend.

Gloria Drake said...

Am halfway through "Confessions of an Innocent Man" by David Dow, a legal thriller that is really thought-provoking as it examines the world of life on death row.

Glen Davis said...

I read:

Killer Thriller by Lee Goldberg; A writer goes to China, and the Chicoms think he knows too much and try to kill him. It was OK, I think Goldberg might be hitting this well one too many times.

False Gods by W. Glenn Duncan Jr.; I really liked the original Raffety series, even though I read them 20 years after they were written. This effort by the son isn't quite as good, although the story about taking ona chiliastic cult wasn't bad.

Whatever It Takes by MJ Markovski; Romantic suspense with way too much whining about returning to a small home town.

The National Team by Caitlin Murray; About the rise of the US women soccer team. Surprisingly grim for such a positive subject.

Lesa said...

Debut author, Gloria. You'll have to let us know next week what you thought. David Dow certainly has the background to write it. Can't wait to hear your final opinion.

Lesa said...

Interesting, Glen. I never would have expected that of a book about the soccer team. Don't you hate whining by the main character in a book?

Glen Davis said...

It certainly took a lot of the inspirational feel out of the book.

Lesa said...

That's too bad, Glen.

Patricia Stoltey said...

I'm reading Cherokee America by Margaret Verble, a historical novel set in the Cherokee Nation after the Civil War.

Carol N Wong said...

Finishing Chasing Cosby, now reading about the last trial. Apparently at least 60 women had rapes from him. Glad the book is closing and he does need to be locked up. I have been trying to read Rabbits For Food vt Binnie Kirshenbaum and cannot get into the story. I may have to give up on it.

The next book is Everything Grows by Aimee Herman, I have been putting it off because of the print size. After that, will finally dipping into to TBR stack and audio books-YAY!!!

Lesa said...

Patricia, Your book, Cherokee America sounds interesting.

I imagine that Chasing Cosby has been a tough book to read, Carol. You need a break.

Carol N Wong said...

You are right. My two grandchildren are coming China next week. Ayla is 8 and Carl is 6. Hoping that we have good weather for the visit!

Lesa said...

I hope you do, too, Carol! And, I hope you have a wonderful time. I don't expect you'll have much reading to report next week.