Thursday, March 21, 2019

What Are You Reading?

I'm actually "playing" with a book right now, rather than reading it. As an early birthday present, a friend gave me a copy of an oversized book,The Lost Files of Nancy Drew. It purports to be Nancy Drew's newly discovered notes about her early cases, beginning with The Secret of the Old Clock. It's what reviews call "an interactive book". In other words, it's a lift-the-flap, open-the-envelope type of book, just fun. Open a paper to find Nancy Drew's list of supplies needed for sleuthing. Or, there's her housekeeper's recipe for chicken and rice. There are summaries of a number of her cases. But, one of my favorite notes comes from The Hidden Staircase. There are a number of amateur sleuths who could learn a thing or two from Nancy Drew. She's smart enough to say when heading off to a strange location, let someone know where you're going so they can try to locate you if you don't show up in a reasonable amount of time. This is such a fun gift that brings back so many memories. I loved this series.


What books are you reading or listening to, or even playing with, this week? I hope you've found something to enjoy. Let us know, please.

23 comments:

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Allen Eskens, THE SHADOWS WE HIDE. This is his sequel to his first book, THE LIFE WE BURY. Joe Talbert, Jr., now a journalist for the AP, discovers that the father he never met was killed. It's a pretty fast read, though it is my procrastination that is taking me longer to finish.

Finally finishing WEST OF GUAM, the complete collection of Jo Gar stories by Raoul Whitfield, which were first published in the early 1930s. Gar is a Manila-based PI. Very atmospheric tales.

I did enjoy BRUNO, CHIEF OF POLICE (Martin Walker) and INTO LOVE AND OUT AGAIN (short stories, Elinor Lipman), which I read this past week.

I've got three new Australian mysteries - by Jane Harper, Emma Viskic, and Chris Hammer - waiting for me at the library. All have been highly recommended. You could look them up.

Sharon said...

This week I finished MURDER IN THE PAPERBACK PARLOR by Ellery Adams. I didn't like it as much as the first book in the series but it was still enjoyable.

Then I read THE QUINTLAND SISTERS by Shelley Wood. It is the story of the Dionne Quintuplets told from the perspective of a fictional nurse's journal entries who was with them from birth to age 5. It ended rather oddly. The author also included actual newspaper articles about the quints. Their daily schedule alone had to be exhausting for their nurses. Their isolation and privileged life was a fascinating story. I found it a good read.

I am still reading a chapter or two a day of WOMEN ROWING NORTH by Mary Pipher.

I think I might start COURTING MR.
EMERSON by Melody Carson today.

Happy Reading!

Lori's Reading Corner said...

I'm reading an ARC of An Unorthodox Match by Naomi Ragen. I love her stuff!

I'm listening to The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris.

Lesa said...

I've read the Chris Hammer book, Jeff. I'm remiss, and haven't yet gotten around to the Jane Harper books. They're on my someday pile.

Lesa said...

Sharon, I wondered about The Quintland Sisters. Thanks for talking about it.

Lesa said...

I haven't read Naomi Ragen for a while, Lori, but I agree. I like her books too.

SandyG265 said...

I read two cozy mystery ARCs this week and enjoyed both DYING FOR DEVIL’S FOOD by Jenn McKinlay and DEATH BY ASSOCIATION by Paula Darnell.

KINGDOM OF NEEDLE AND BONE by Mira Grant. It’s a look at a world being swept by pandemics because people aren’t getting vaccinated.

THE GOLDEN CIRCLE. It’s the fifth book in Lee Falk’s The Phantom series about a gang of female jewel thieves.

Margie Bunting said...

I think I liked Amanda Flower's MURDERS AND METAPHORS better than Sandy did. In the third Magical Bookshop Mystery series, Charming Books proprietor Violet Waverly is upset when her friend Lacey is arrested for the murder of her (Lacey's) sister, an obnoxious sommelier and author in town for a book signing at a nearby winery during the ice wine festival. And, of course, Violet's would-be beau, Police Chief Rainwater, is not too happy when she gets involved. Violet is also trying to come to terms with being the new caretaker of a book shop where the perfect book often presents itself to customers in need, an ancient tree growing inside needs special spring water to survive, and pets Faulkner (a crow) and Emerson (a cat) often seem to be more than just pets. Personally, I find the scenario--well--charming! And I enjoy this series and the Amish Candy Shop Mysteries from this author, who recently gave up her long-term librarian job to write full-time.

Many of you have already read Bill Crider's THAT OLD SCOUNDREL DEATH. In the late author's most recent entry in the continuing saga of Sheriff Dan Rhoades, there's someone new in town who seems to be using a lot of aliases, including Bruce Wayne! When he turns up dead, there is no dearth of suspects. I really enjoy the author's folksy style and quirky characters. It's a good thing there are 24 other books in the series!

The first in a new series from award-winning Sujata Massey is over a year old now and I'm pleased to see a sequel coming in May. Perveen Mistry is one of the first female lawyers in 1920s India, having gone through a lot of misery to finally join her father's law firm in Bombay. Although not yet permitted to try a case in court, she can do much of the legwork and research required of her role. When three secluded wives of a recently deceased wealthy entrepreneur are being strong-armed to give up their inheritances, Perveen intervenes. It's easier for her than for any man to speak to these sequestered women and their children to find out who or what may be behind their dilemma, which ultimately turns deadly. The story flashes back and forth between this case and Perveen's earlier personal history, and it's a fascinating look at the times in India and at an interesting protagonist who is easy to root for.

Lesa said...

We have two librarians this week who quit to write full time. Sandy mentions Jenn McKinlay, and Margie mentions Amanda Flower. I've met Amanda, but I know Jenn better because of living in Arizona. I'm just so happy to see both of them successful. I haven't read the Magical Bookshop Mystery series, which sounds as if I'd love it. I have read one of Amanda's Magic Garden books, and I really liked that.

I do need to read Sujata Massey's books.

Mark Baker said...

I need to finish up THE HIDDEN CORPSE by Debra Sennefelder today. Too much middle grade fun this month and I’m behind on my regular reads with several deadlines looming in April.

Netteanne said...

Finsihed reading the second Medlar mystery by Jude Deveraux, A Justified Murder. Very entertaining. Am currently reading for a book club Second Street Station by Lawrence H Levy.

It is fiction with real people in the story. Mary Handley was the first female detective in Brooklyn in the late 19th century. I am enjoying it a lot.

Next up is listening to Judgment by Joseph Finder.

Lesa said...

I didn't think Hidden Corpse lived up to the promise of the first book, Mark. We'll see what you think.

Lesa said...

I'm glad you enjoyed A Justified Murder, Netteanne. Entertaining is the right word for it. And, I love to hear you're enjoying the book for your book club.

Bill Anderson said...

I'm reading Greg Iles' CEMETERY ROAD. It's a standalone and then I'm going to either start the new Harlan Coben RUN AWAY or the new Candice Fox REDEMPTION POINT. I may even start both of them. Lol. I also want to get to Jenn McKinlay's books soon too.

Lesa said...

A crime fiction streak right now, Bill. Sounds good to me!

Charlotte said...

Great to read all about the books everyone has read this week.

May all your reading the rest of the week and next week be fulfilling for all of you.

Lesa said...

Thank you, Charlotte! I'm also reading Deanna Raybourn's latest, A Dangerous Collaboration, which is wonderful! Sending hugs!

Glen Davis said...

SandyG: I have all of the Phantom paperbacks. They're pretty good for what they are.

This week I read:

4 of 5 books in the Nick Carter series. Pretty indistinguishable. Some people can read books like this and tell who the authors are. Sometimes I can do that in the Mack bolan or Destroyer series, but never Nick Carter.

The Silver Gun by LA Chandler; I don't really get Depression era nostalgia.

Mercy River by Glen Erik Hamilton; Apparently, there is only enough room in Oregon for two plots. Either we get radical environmentalists or White supremacists. In this case, we get the latter, as Van Shaw travels to Oregon to help a ranger friend out of a death sentence. Great stuff.

Lesa said...

I have Mercy River here, Glen. I had watched the Poisoned Pen video with Glen Erik Hamilton, so I knew about the plot. I love your comment about Oregon, though!

Gram said...

After having the flu for two weeks and unable to read, I am back at it with the already mentioned Jenn McJinlay and her librarian series - A Likely Story...books and recipes...this time they are discussing one of my favorites - The Daughter of Time. Also reading my first V M Burns - The Plot is Murder. Andrea Kane's A Face to Die For, she has a new one out now. I am reminded that I must get back to the Amanda Flower's Magical Bookshop stories.

katstev said...

How to Walk Away by Katherine Center on audio in the car. The First Lady by James Patterson on audio cd @ home. The Secretary by Renee Knight in print.

Lesa said...

Gram! I'm happy to hear you've recovered from a nasty bout of flu. Jenn McKinlay's book is a good way to get back into reading, though. I loved The Daughter of Time, too. I just picked up my first Magical Bookshop mystery. I hadn't tried that series yet. Good to have you healthy & back to reading!

Lesa said...

I have a friend who read The First Lady, Kat, and really enjoyed it. I hope you enjoy some of those books!