Thursday, February 28, 2019

What Are You Reading?

Let's celebrate Thursday! It's my Friday this week. I'm off tomorrow. I have #AskaLibrarian on Twitter at 11 AM. And, I'm going to talk books with all of you. I can't wait to see what you're reading.

I'm reading a funny novel. It's already made me laugh a couple times, and I'm only on page fifty. It's called Please Don't Feed the Mayor by Sue Pethick. Melanie MacDonald moved back to her hometown of Fossett, Oregon, opened a coffee shop, and wants to help the town survive and thrive. After the lumber mill closed, people moved away. What would attract people to the town? Well, tourists might come, and maybe people would stay, if Melanie's border collie, Shep, was the mayor. There are a few problems. The town has never had a mayor, and Melanie viewed Shep as an attraction. But, someone wants to run for mayor against Shep. And, Melanie's ex-husband? She called him to ask for legal advice. Now, he's in town, hiding from an escaped killer who threatened to kill the attorneys who put him away. (I love Shep.)

What are you reading this week? I hope you're enjoying your book.


29 comments:

Christie said...

I just heard a story on NPR last night about a dog who was elected mayor of the town! He served four one year terms, but unfortunately passed away recently at the age of 13, several years after his retirement. Getting a picture taken with him was a big draw.
Next up for reading for me is Rhys Bowen's The Victory Garden.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Love the cover.

I'm reading Bill Crider's final Sheriff Rhodes book, THAT OLD SCOUNDREL DEATH. It's been back and forth with other books as I had collections to finish and wasn't in a hurry for this one to end. First I finished Elinor Lipman's I CAN'T COMPLAIN, her very enjoyable collection of essays. It also contains her pieces about the death of her husband at 60, following a short but awful illness. short story collections were BIBLIOMYSTERIES Volume Two, edited by Otto Penzler, and SIX MONTHS, THREE DAYS, FIVE OTHERS, a collection of science fiction and fantasy stories from Charlie Jane Anders that I enjoyed a lot. I have novels by Lipman and Anders on hold at the library now.

Besides the Crider, I am reading Christopher Anvil's collection of "space opera" type stories, INTERSTELLAR PATROL. I particularly like the LARGE PRINT in this trade size collection.

Sharon said...

I finished THAT CHURCHILL WOMAN by Stephanie Barron. It was good but not great. It mostly detailed her affair with Charles Kinsky.

Now I am reading the mystery COOKIN THE BOOKS bt Amy Patricia Meade. Tish owns a restaurant that uses literary themes. So far I am enjoying it.

Happy Reading!

Charlotte said...

Just checking in.
I am taking a couple of Christian study courses at this time.
So I am reading Christian books right now, which I am not listing.

Have a happy reading week.

Lesa said...

That's funny, Christie. Works for a small town, I guess. This book reminds me of a Hallmark movie. I hope you enjoy Rhys Bowen's new book!

Lesa said...

Jeff, It sounds as if you had a good reading week. I can understand, though, why you don't want to see Bill Crider's book end.

Lesa said...

Sharon, In that case, I may take my copy of That Churchill Woman back to the library. That's disappointing.

Lesa said...

Charlotte, Thank you for checking in. We would have worried about you if we hadn't heard from you! Hugs!

SandyG265 said...

I read an ARC of FAIR GAME by Annette Dashofy. It’s the next book in her Zoe Chambers mystery series. It’s a good story plus she used my name as one of the characters in the book which was a lot of fun.

I also read two novellas; SLEIGHING IT IN KINSEY FALLS by Gayle Leeson and CRIMINALLY COCOA by Amanda Flower. And a cute book from the children’s library, SPY SCHOOL by Stuart Gibbs, about a boy who winds up in a CIA spy academy even though he has no idea what he’s getting into.

Margie Bunting said...

I had gotten distracted from Mary Pipher's WOMEN ROWING NORTH, but this week I finished it. This "guide to wisdom, authenticity, and bliss for women as they age" is especially poignant for women 60 and over. I discovered a lot of insights and "aha" moments and found it inspirational.

HURRICANE OF LOVE is former QVC veteran host Dan Wheeler's recounting of his life with wife Beth before, and mostly after, her diagnosis with stage 4 cancer. Dan took care of her for 3 years before her death, and they were years full of love. Reportedly, Beth was the kind of person who exuded love for everyone. Dan had to balance her illness with his responsibilities at QVC. I saw quite a few similarities to what I went through with Mike and enjoyed reading Dan's story. Dan subsequently co-founded Fearless Faith Ministries, and I enjoy reading their "Morning Cup of Inspiration" on Facebook.

I've enjoyed Maia Chance's series about the Discreet Retrieval Agency, run by Lola and Berta in the Prohibition era, and NAUGHTY ON ICE is no exception. Visiting Vermont to help a client reclaim her stolen antique ring, they find themselves involved with a dysfunctional wealthy family when more than one of its members is murdered. It's a fun setting, with an abundance of maple sugar candy and a ski jumping contest, but I'm in it mostly for the spunky characters and snappy dialogue.

Last week Lesa memorably reviewed Patricia Marcantonio's FELICITY CARROL AND THE PERILOUS PURSUIT, and I had to read it so I ordered it on Kindle. Felicity is supremely intelligent--she lied about her age to go to college at 15 and has two degrees and a prodigious memory for facts. Too bad her wealthy father seemed to check out after the deaths of Felicity's mother and older brother. In the Victorian era, women generally strove to make good marriages, but Felicity is much more interested in using her talents to help solve her mentor/father figure's murder and the theft of his priceless Arthurian manuscript. As more murders occur and more King Arthur-related lore disappears, she puts herself in jeopardy, to the dismay of a young Scotland Yard inspector investigating the cases. Felicity is a fascinating character, and I hope this is the beginning of a series. And yes, the plot does have similarities to a certain Broadway musical that Lesa and I have seen.

Lesa said...

Sandy, My recommendation for a children's book this week is called The Donkey Egg. So funny!

Lesa said...

Margie, I'm so happy you enjoyed Women Rowing North as well as Felicity Carrol. As you said, Women Rowing North hit home. And, Felicty Carrol was fun even though we both figured out "whodunnit". I love the characters in that book.

Mark Baker said...

Your book sounds like tons of fun.

I’ve just started Lion Down, the just released FunJungle mystery from Stuart Gibbs. His middle grade books are always a delight, so I’m looking forward to really getting into it. I’m only 20 pages in so far.

Lesa said...

After I wrote my comments, Mark, I realized it reads like a Hallmark channel movie. It is fun. I've never heard of Stuart Gibbs. Going to have to look him up.

Glen Davis said...

I read:

That Old Scoundrel Death by Bill Crider; Like everyone else, I had a bittersweet experience with this one. One of the things I liked best, is that it doesn't really read like a final.

The Climb; About the disastrous Mt. Everest climbs of 1996. I remember at the time it seemed like anyone could climb Everest. We were all wrong.

Murder at Rough Point by Alyssa Maxwell; A cozy set in fin de siecle Hyde Park. There's a murder, if you can get past all the talking.

Director's Cut by Alton Gansky; Inspirational mystery about an actress being stalked by a murderer.

Don't Know Much About History by Kenneth C. Davis; a popular history this is occasionally wrong, and full of 1990's faux cynicism.

Bruno, Chief of Police; Sort f like a Dan Rhodes novel set in France.

donna from CT said...

Finished The Widow by Fiona Barton - not as good as her latest The Suspect. Reading the latest Peter Robinson Careless Love - I've read all of his Inspector Banks books and just love them. He is at the top of my favorite authors. I feel like the characters are friends of mine.

Lesa said...

Then, I'm going to have to try the Bruno, Chief of Police books, Glen. I haven't read any of them. Thank you.

Lesa said...

Donna, I picked up the very first Inspector Banks book today. I have never read any of them. I hope I like them as much as you do!

donna from CT said...

Lesa - Peter Robinson is such a good writer - I know you will like them.

Lesa said...

It took me forever to get the first book, Donna. Thank you!

Sandie Herron said...

I've just started a new book by Shirley Rousseau Murphy due out April 23rd called CAT CHASE THE MOON. I love her entire Joe Grey series about the talking cats in a small town in California that could be an exact duplicate for Carmel. This is book 21, and it's just as fresh as the first entries in the series. Joe Grey's kittens are growing up and getting into trouble on their own! Great fun and engrossing.

Lesa said...

And, maybe we'll see a review of Cat Chase the Moon eventually on the blog, Sandie?

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Lesa, as a fan of British mysteries, I think you'll like the Peter Robinson books.

Ruth said...

I loved Storm Front by Jim Butcher. So glad there are more in this series.

Also finished Murder in Saint-Germain by Cara Black. I'll look for more in the Aimee Leduc mysteries.

I finished The Enchantment Emporium by Tanya Huff. I was OK, but I won't look for the next in the series.

Up next is The Janissary Tree by Jason Goodwin. A friend highly recommended it.

Thanks Sandie, I've never read any of Shirley Rousseau Murphy mysteries. We lived in Carmel a few years ago and absolutely loved it. I'll check them out.

The Bruno, Chief of Police series are delightful. I love them and am so glad I still have a few to go in the series, they are nice to savor.

Lesa said...

Thanks, Jeff. I'm looking forward to starting that book. Soon!

Lesa said...

Ruth, I like your comments about whether or not you're going to continue with a series. Thank you!

Gram said...

I really enjoy and look forward to What are you Reading day. I have now put Women Rowing North on hold (10th) at the library and decided to put That Churchill Woman at the bottom of my list. Thanks to all.

BPL Ref said...

This sounds like a good one, even if it is a dog and not a cat (a tip of the hat to the late, great Mayor Stubbs). I just finished An Elderly Lady is Up to No Good, which was good, though I have a quibble with the last story. I'm currently reading and enjoying The Unmentionable Murder by James Work, which is set in the new Rocky Mountain National Park around 1923. Ranger McIntyre is a WWI vet who enjoys his job and who likes figuring out puzzles.... like why two dead bodies have turned up with the deceased clad in nothing but underpants. It's delightful so far. Also reading Goodbye, Crueller World, second in the Deputy Donut series. I'm enjoying it more than I did the first. It's competently written and I like that the heroine has respect for the process (i.e., cops aren't incompetent and don't need amateurs to do their sleuthing for them but she still is able to help.)

katstev said...

Finishing up Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafron on audio in the car. Listening to The Perfect Alibi by Philip Margolin at home. Print book is The Hiding Place by CJ Tudor and Lies by TM Logan on ebook.