Thursday, September 13, 2018

What Are You Reading?

Although I downloaded Bob Woodward's Fear, I haven't started it yet. I'm on deadline again (am I always saying that to you?), but I'm also still reading Juliet Blackwell'sThe Lost Carousel of Provence. My actual excuse is Bouchercon, and talking to Mom about Hurricane Florence. I hope all of you are safe or moving to higher ground.


If you're away from the hurricane or other weather threats, what are you reading this week?

25 comments:

Nann said...

Early in the week I read "Earning the Rockies," the PBS News Hour book club selection for September. The author's style was irritating--but that makes for good discussion. The book I'm reading now (nearly finished) is far more appealing: "The Library Book" by Susan Orlean. (Publication mid-October.) It's about the Los Angeles Central Library which was destroyed by an arson-set fire in 1986 -- so it's partly about libraries, but also about fires and arson and social commentary about the people that a major urban library serves.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

What with a week in Florida, I haven't had much reading time this week. Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your point of view), that hasn't stopped the books from coming in. At Bouchercon, I only got two books that I brought home - the final Sheriff Dan Rhodes book by Bill Crider (thanks to Bill's daughter Angela), THAT OLD SCOUNDREL DEATH)and Lou Berney's NOVEMBER ROAD. But I also took the new issues of EQMM and AHMM, and a Sara Blaedel giveaway novella, THE WOMAN IN THE HOTEL. Then I had several books waiting at the library, including THE GUILTY DEAD (P. J. Tracy, probably my next read) and DEPTH OF WINTER (Craig Johnson). And on top of that, two of my ebook holds had to be downloaded - Jo Walton's AMONG OTHERS and Carrie Vaughn's THE WILD DEAD. Plus, after seeing her at the convention, I downloaded Danish author Blaedel's first book set in Racine, Wisconsin, THE DAUGHTER (aka THE UNDERTAKER'S DAUGHTER).

Actual reading? Michael Mammay's PLANETSIDE (I've been reading more SF than usual lately). I'm also reading Jo Walton's AN INFORMAL HISTORY OF THE HUGOS (1953-2000), which, not surprisingly, is giving me even more books to add to my list!

Lori's Reading Corner said...

I'm reading an ARC of Cut & Run by Mary Burton. I've always been a fan of hers. And I just started listening to A Death In Live Oak by James Grippando. Another fave of mine.

Sharon said...

This week I gobbled up ANOTHER WOMAN'S Husband by Gill Paul. Dual storylines about Wallis Simpson told through her friendship with Mary Kirk who married Ernest Simpson. Second storyline was Princess Diana's car crash. Filmmaker Alex and vintage store owner Rachel witness the aftermath leaving Paris after a romantic weekend. The two storylines intersect in an interesting albeit fictional way.

Now I am reading MEET ME AT THE MUSEUM by Anne Youngson. I am finding it rather somber but enjoying it. I am disappointed I have not had a chance to read more of it this week.

Prayers for those in Florence's path and Happy Reading everyone.

Charlotte said...

Books finished:

0

Still reading:

Desert Rage by Betty Webb
Purrfect Murder by Nic Saint

I am so happy that I love books and reading them each day.
📚📚📚📚☕️

Netteanne said...

Just finished Broken Places by Tracy Clark (won from Lesa) and it was very good. Gritty and some violence with a very interesting PI in Cass Raines. I checked her website and this is the first of a three book series. Set in Chicago and she gives you a sense of the city as well as the neighborhoods. I would recommend it.

Next up is the new Miranda James Claws for Concern. Love Diesel the cat and a road trip is coming up Friday so will be listening to the new J A Jance Joanna book Field of Bones. Been following Joanna from the very beginning, Jance is one of my go to authors.

Lesa said...

I'm looking forward to picking up The Library Book, Nann.

Lesa said...

A lot of familiar titles on that list, Jeff. Not the science fiction, but quite a few of the others. I'm glad you're home, tucked in away from storms, I hope!

Lesa said...

Comfort reads, Lori, when you can catch up with books by favorite authors. I love it!

Lesa said...

I love that you "gobbled up" a book, Sharon. My kind of reading that you just want to dive into. I'm glad you mentioned Florence. I agree. Prayers for those in its path.

Lesa said...

Reading brings comfort and sanity to my life, Charlotte. Yes, books can be upsetting at times, but they're books we choose. I wish you happy reading in the week ahead.

Lesa said...

Netteanna, I'm so glad you enjoyed Broken Places. That was such a wonderful debut. I hope the next two books are as good.

Safe travels on your road trip!

Margie Bunting said...

In Lisa Jewell's THEN SHE WAS GONE, Laurel's life changes forever when her cherished youngest child, Ellie, disappears without a trace at age 15. Her marriage comes to an end, and her relationships with her two remaining children sour. Ten years later, she is just starting to recover when she meets Floyd, but she is shocked to find that his younger daughter, the precocious 9-year-old Poppy, bears an uncanny resemblance to Ellie. A quick read and an effective psychological suspense story.

Each of Fiona Davis's books features a historical building in NYC, with linked stories from two time periods. THE MASTERPIECE focuses on Grand Central Terminal and its once-prestigious art school. During the Depression, Clara was an outstanding commercial illustrator who dreamed of getting her paintings accepted in a male-dominated world. In the mid-1970s, divorcee Virginia found a low-paying job at the Grand Central information booth and happened upon a lost painting that could be the key to a long-term mystery and her own future. An engrossing story that made me want to look for Davis's books on the Barbizon and the Dakota.

I finally got around to reading LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE by Celeste Ng, and I'm glad I did. Elena Richardson, her lawyer husband, and her four high-school-age children are a typical family in their upscale Shaker Heights neighborhood. When the peripatetic Mia and her daughter, Pearl, come to town, they deeply affect each of the Richardsons' lives in different and unexpected ways. A legal case involving a neighbor who has adopted a Chinese child and the child's biological mother, who had given her up, makes everyone re-examine their beliefs and shakes their lives to the core. An exceptional book, full of beautiful writing and complex characters.

Lesa reviewed THE MAN WHO COULDN'T MISS by David Handler, second in the revived Stewart Hoag Mysteries. Stewart is writing a new book in ex-wife Merilee's carriage house in rural CT as Merilee tries to save a failing playhouse by directing a production of "Private Lives" and starring with three other veteran actors. Of course, there are murders, and Stewart can't help stepping in to help solve them. Breezily written with interesting characters. A very quick and enjoyable read. I enjoy Handler's Berger and Mitry series as well.

SallyB said...

Finished FEORGE & LIZZIE (Nancy Pearl) which I really enjoyed. Next I read THE LEMONADE YEAR (Amy Willoughby-Burle) which wasn't as appealing to me. Nina, the protagonist, was a bit too self-involved and the family dynamics just didn't ring true to me. Now I'm reading DEATH OF A COZY WRITER, the first in the St. Just series, by G.M. Malliet. I've read her Max Tudor series (loved) and am enjoying this book.

Mark Baker said...

Last night, I stayed up later than should have to finish Murder on Marble Row by Victoria Thompson. Im going to jump forward a couple of decades and across the Atlantic with Murder Flies the Coop by Jessica Ellicott.

Kay said...

I've been in a Gothic mode lately and have read several books that fit that sort of fall-ish theme - spooky, you know? Anyway, I'm about to the mid-point of Brendan Duffy's HOUSE OF ECHOES - family moves to upstate New York and is renovating a giant house - weird things in the woods - weird people in the village - can't tell if things are on the horror end of the scale or just 'bad' people out there.

I also read Carol Goodman's first book, THE LAKE OF DEAD LANGUAGES, which is set at a girls' school in New England. A woman comes back with her small daughter to teach Latin there. There are myths and strange things, perhaps a family curse - frozen lakes and those creepy woods.

Plus I finished LET THE DEAD REST by J.P. Choquette. There is a vintage doll that is sent in the present day and another story included about the same doll. A soldier returning from WWII Europe brings it to his girlfriend. Strange things happen in both times. As I said, I'm reading on the spooky side right now (as I tend to do in Sept/Oct).

Lesa said...

Margie, I want to read The Masterpiece, and I just haven't had time. Happy to hear you liked it. Some of you are writing such interesting summaries. Thank you!

SallyB, I liked the names of characters in Malliet's St. Just series. Amusing.

I have Murder Flies the Coop in some pile, Mark. I'm looking forward to reading about the characters again.

I think you read a little too spooky for me, Kay. I answered 2 questions today from different people about Fall cozy mysteries. I mentioned Krista Davis' The Diva Haunts a House & Leigh Perry's The Skeleton Haunts a House. Both fun mysteries. My all-time favorite fall book, though, is Ray Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes. Love the movie as well.

Glen Davis said...

I read Imperium by Robert Harris; I thought this was going to be something like the SPQR series, but instead it's a serious novel about trials of Cicero.

Framed in Lace by Monica Ferris; Minnesota must be a very dangerous place and needlepoint is more dangerous than I thought.

Paradise by Kevin Scott Orson; short prequel to the Michael Quinn spy series.

Murder at Spouter's Point by Leslie Wheeler; about a murder at a Powwow, which doesn't much resemble any powwow I've ever attended.

The Good Assassin by Paul Viditch; a retro novel about spy-jinks in Batista era Cuba, including encounters with Ernest Hemingway.

Lesa said...

That will teach you to take needlepoint too lightly, Glen.

SandyG265 said...

I was on vacation so the only book I finished was Live and Let Chai by Bree Baker. It was an enjoyable cozy.

Gram said...

Just started Leverage in Death by J D Robb, Tear Me Apart by J T Ellison, and The Guilty Party by P, J, Tracy - the Monkeewrench series is among my favorites.

Grandma Cootie said...

I got diverted a little this week but enjoying the reading. I wanted to read J. A. Jance's latest, Field of Bones, but realized I had Downfall on my shelf and hadn't read it. So went through those two (loved them as I have loved her books from the start) and decided I needed to revisit the first in the series so am reading Desert Heat. As good as I remembered.

Lesa said...

I don't read much when I'm on vacation either, Sandy.

Right with you on the Monkeewrench books, Gram.

Isn't it wonderful to go back and read favorites, Grandma Cootie?

Carol N Wong said...

I finish listening to David Baldacci's The Last Mile. I did not want to end so I added the next in the series to my "to buy list. Now listening to John Grisham's The Racketeer. It pales in comparison. Using my magnifying glass to read Paula McClain's Love and Ruin Interesting when they were both in Spain but now Hemingway and his next wife to be is not. But I love the parts about Eleanor Roosevelt/

Also loving a children's book, What Goes Up by Wen Jan Baragrey. A little girl with albinoism, an autistic mother and a mysterious missing father.

Kaye Barley said...

I love this book! I love her other books about Paris as well. But this one - well, this one was one I really connected with.