Thursday, May 24, 2018

What Are You Reading?

I met my deadline, and I'm reading a book for me! Unfortunately, I feel as if I missed one someplace. I'm reading Dark Rites, one of Heather Graham's Krewe of Hunters books. I think I missed one because it sounds as if there was a book set in Massachusetts that dealt with a group called the Undertakers. Oh, well. That's okay. I'm not far, but someone is attacking people, and leaving notes about witches and Satanism. When a historian goes missing, a friend and her boyfriend, a Special Agent with the FBI's Krewe of Hunters goes looking for him.


What books are you reading or listening to this week? I'm not in a museum today, so I'll have time to check back now and then throughout the day.

We're waiting!


36 comments:

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

That's funny, because Jackie just asked me to check on two Heather Graham books for her yesterday. For those who like a crazy sense of humor with their paranormal romance, she is reading Shelly Laurenston's HOT AND BADGERED, by the way. Laurenston also writes a funny dragon series as G. A. Aiken, another favorite of hers.

I'm reading a couple of short story collections (no surprise there):
Robert Sheckley, STORE OF THE WORLDS, science fictional. "Seventh Victim" was adapted and filmed as THE TENTH VICTIM 50 years ago.
Second is Elaine Viets' collection of mysteries, including entries from her various series, DEAL WITH THE DEVIL and 13 Short Stories.

It's been a while since I read a Bill Slider book by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles and I have several on the shelf, so I started the next one, FELL PURPOSE (orig. 2009). And lastly I started a futuristic spy novel that sounded like fun, WAYPOINT KANGAROO by Curtis C. Chen. Just started that one, so can't really comment, other than the first person narration seems fun.

Earlier this week I finished THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT, the collection of St. Mary's stories by Jodi Taylor, which are about 50 pages each and originally published in ebook form separately. Fans of the series will enjoy them. I'm waiting for the next one from the library now. Also read TERMS OF ENLISTMENT by Marko Kloos, military SF set in the not too far future, the first in a series. Obviously, I've been reading science fiction mixed in with the mysteries lately.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Lesa, I checked her shelf and the Heather Graham you mentioned with the Undertaker, set in Boston, is DYING BREATH. Sounds nasty,

Lesa said...


Jeff, I think I'm going to skip Dying Breath because of your phrase, "Sounds nasty." Thanks for checking. You may have saved me from a book that I might not have enjoyed.

Lesa said...

Well, my mistake. I read Dying Breath a year ago. I checked on the review. I don't remember it at all, although I remember Vickie, Griffin & the ghost.

Kay said...

Heather Graham is an author that I've meant to read for a long time. Perhaps at some point. I'm reading Christine Trent's No Cure For the Dead - 1st in her new Florence Nightingale series. So far, so good. And I'm listening to The Ice Princess - 1st in Camilla Lackberg's series. I've decided that summer will be audio rereads for me. I do that periodically and enjoy it a lot.

Oh, and my review today is Dear Mrs. Bird - a book not yet available here in the US, but already out in the UK. It was delightful.

Kaye Barley said...

I've read two advance reading copies that I want to tell everyone in the whole wide world about - Hank Phillippi Ryan's "Trust Me," and Kate Morton's "The Clockmaker's Daughter." Both excellent. Hank's is a departure from her past books and she does one heck of a job with psychological suspense. Kate Morton's has a touch of Gothic which I love.

Charlotte said...

Hi Everyone,
I finished the following books:

Death on the Move by Bill Crider
Evil at the Root by Bill Crider
Murder in Mykonos by Jeffrey Siger
Assassins of Athens by Jeffrey Siger
The Anteater of Death by Betty Webb

This list is for two weeks.
I enjoyed all the books above. The kind you don’t like to stop till you get to the last page.

I am now reading:

Death by Rum Balls by Colleen Mooney
The Koala of Death by Betty Webb Really looking forward to starting this one today.

How great it is to have books to read each day. A blessing and I am thankful.
📚📚📚📚📚📚☕️

Charlotte said...

Kaye,
I love Hank Phillippi Ryan and Kate Morton.
I am very behind in their books.
Thank you for telling us about their new books.

Margie Bunting said...

Charlotte, I've enjoyed all of Betty Webb's Gunn Zoo Mysteries. Glad you're enjoying them. I'm currently reading The Otter of Death, which Lesa has already reviewed, and it's great so far.

I read Mary Kay Andrews' The High Tide Club. Brooke left her job at a high-powered Atlanta legal firm to escape her personal troubles and moved with her 3-year-old son to open her own small office on a barrier island. There she is summoned by nonagenarian Josephine, terminally ill and living in a crumbling but imposing mansion. Josephine wants to divide her estate among a few select people whom she feels she has wronged. The story alternates between the present and the 1940s, Josephine and a few friends are coming of age in this idyllic setting, but an unexpected death ruins everything. I enjoyed the story and read it quickly, although it could have been 100 pages shorter and one of the male characters strained credulity, to say the least.

In husband-and-wife Graeme Simsion and Anne Buist's Two Steps Forward, American Zoe and British Martin each embark on the Camino, a long walk through France and Spain historically taken by pilgrims, to prove something to themselves and others. They meet often on the walk, forming an uneasy friendship that could develop into something more. The book proceeds at a lazy pace, alternating chapters between the two protagonists, portraying their daily travails and discoveries, as well as their fellow pilgrims. The end is gratifying, and I enjoyed spending time with the characters, although I would have appreciated a bit more in terms of pace and plot. My favorite Simsion book is still The Rosie Project, which is hard to beat.

In the Reluctant Fortune-Teller by Keziah Frost, Norbert has been frugal during his accounting career, but at 73 he is having some financial worries. Three pushy female acquaintances--seniors themselves--take on Norbert as their latest project, schooling him in card reading and convincing him he can eliminate his financial problems by becoming their town's only practicing fortune teller. At first reluctant, Norbert discovers that he actually has some talent in this area and proceeds to make a success out of the venture. But deep down he worries that he might harm someone with his reading. This is an utterly charming quick read that will stick with you. Frost is a promising debut author, and I can't wait for her next book.

Charlotte said...

Margie, I started reading the Gunn Zoo Mysteries because Lesa had the review of The Otter of Death. I am starting at the beginning of the series. I like to start there. One of the libraries in our system has the new book already. To put a hold on a new book you must wait six months. I really love Otters and can’t wait to read the book. I didn’t won’t to pay $9.99 for a Kindle book. Since the library has it I will wait. These others are great reading.

Sharon said...

I started Gill Paul's THE AFFAIR because I enjoyed THE SECRET WIFE so much. I got to page 180 and gave up. The alternating chapters of the mafia and drugs were an odd pairing with the making of the film Cleopatra with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.

Now I am reading THE OPTIMIST'S GUIDE TO LETTING GO by Amy E. Reichert. It is not bad but the chapters about the 14 angst are dragging to down for me. So far none of her subsequent books have matched THE COINCIDENCE OF THE COCONUT CAKE for me.

Jeff, I read all the Elliott Roosevelt mysteries as well as the Margaret Truman ones. I had no clue they were ghost written. I spend an enjoyable hour or so researching it. I learned something new. Thank you.

Lesa said...

Kay! Dear Mrs. Bird is on my right now, this weekend, try to read pile. I think I need to call my TBR pile "Try to Read". Happy to hear you enjoyed it.

Lesa said...

Kaye, Hank is going to be thrilled that you want to tell everyone about Trust Me. She told me she was going to hold her breath until I read it. I told her that worried me.

SandyG265 said...

I didn’t get much reading time this week.

I finished A MAN CALLED OVE which wasn’t really my type of book but my boyfriend enjoyed the audiobook and wanted me to read it.
I also read a kids books about bats, BAT CITIZENS by Rob Laidaw which was a quick read. I saw it on the library shelf when I was walking through the kids department on the way to a gardening program.

Lesa said...

Charlotte - Several of my favorites there - Bill Crider, Jeff Siger, Betty Webb. You had a good couple weeks of reading. And, don't feel behind! Hank Phillippi Ryan's is a standalone, so you haven't missed a series. And, all of Morton's are standalones, I think.

Lesa said...

Margie, That was my reaction to Mary Kay Andrews' book as well. And, I didn't think the characters worked together as a group. I'll probably skip the second book since you weren't too excited about it. I'll pass it on to the friend who has a note on my copy.

Lesa said...

Sharon - Here's hoping for some more enjoyable reading for you. But, at least you enjoyed the research.

Lesa said...

Sandy, We all have those weeks, as you can tell by my recent blog. But, you went to a library program! That counts in my book.

Margie Bunting said...

Charlotte, I am surprised your library won't let you put a new book on hold for six months. Maybe Lesa can weigh in on whether that's standard. It's been a while since I've had library cards at both of the libraries I patronize, so maybe I just forgot about their policies for new members. I get most of my books from libraries, and I rely heavily on holds. I'm always thrilled when I'm the first in line for a book, and that often comes from finding out what books from favorite authors are coming out in six months (Library Journal Prepub Alert is helpful). Anyway, I love the Gunn Zoo books because of the animal stories behind the mysteries.

Sharon, I'm glad you commented about Amy Reichert's new book. I loved The Coincidence of Coconut Cake but her others . . . not so much. I couldn't even finish Love, Luck, and Lemon Pie. I think I'll take a pass on this one, thanks to your review. Too many good things to read!

Lesa said...

It's a little different at every library, Charlotte & Margie. My guess is it's a budget matter. They buy new books, but probably do a "Lucky Day" or "Express Book" collection of some sort so people have to come in & take a chance at getting the books because they don't have a large enough budget to fill all the holds on popular books.

Charlotte said...

Margie and Lesa, I looked up how many books the Pines Library system has, only two available. I have no clue how many libraries are in that system. Neither book is in my library. I really feel blessed that any of Betty Webb books are available. Because of money they did away with the Overdrive system for ebooks and gave us RBdigital which isn’t any good at all. I really don’t understand why GA is having money problems in our libraries. The library here is large, just doesn’t have enough of the popular books anymore. Use to when we moved here over 40 years ago. If I get desperate I can buy the ebook for my Kindle.

Glen Davis said...

I read The Middle Man by Oleg Steinhauer, I didn't finish it.

Operation Black Swan by Owen Parr, a middling espionage novel about stopping the usual megalo-maniacal billionaire.

Field of Valor by Matthew Betley, a much better book about stopping the usual megalo-maniacal billionaire. The two billionaires are the exact same guy, take-offs of George Soros.

Orang by Wayne Marinovich; A vigilante environmentalist tries to stop animal trafficking, and a corrupt cop, given a second chance, tries to stop him.

Frozen Past by Richard C Hale; A melding of IT and a police procedural which is effectively creepy, and a lot shorter than IT.

Liz said...

Just started a new series, with Murder on Olympus by Robert B. Warren. Not sure about this one.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Charlotte, the Brooklyn Public Library system uses Overdrive, which I have, plus another system that I don't. Some books have both available, some have one or the other (more Overdrive, thankfully), and some don't have any ebooks available. But overall, more and more books do seem to be available that way, which is good for when we are in Florida in the winter.

SandyG265 said...

Lesa,

We go to a lot of library programs. We have 10 libraries in our county system and can go to any of them. A few weeks ago we went to a free program on Korean cooking, where they gave us two books and a full 5 item lunch. We’ve also seen films and listened to live music. I wish they’d bring in more authors though.

Lesa said...

Oh, Charlotte. It breaks my heart that the libraries have had to drop OverDrive & can't afford to provide what customers really want. I'm sorry.

Lesa said...

Frozen Past, Glen! Shorter than IT. What isn't?

Lesa said...

Sorry about that, Liz.

Lesa said...

Fabulous, Sandy! So good to hear you attend a lot of programs.

Charlotte said...

For those who like Betty Webb. I wrote her tonight and
this was her reply.
Good news.

Probably, Charlotte. I keep falling in love with animals, then have to write about them! At present I'm writing another Lena Jones book (last one was "Desert Vengeance"), while at the same time, doing a little research on the next Gunn Zoo mystery. But what beastie is going to be on the cover is yet undecided.

Gram said...

I;m reading The Dark Angel by Elly Griffiths, some of Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe books - I'm sure I read them but it has been so many years that they are like new to me, just finished rereading one of my favorite J D Robb books - Treachery in Death and also just finished Kay Hooper's latest Hold Back the Dark. This must have been the week for Dark to be popular.

Carol N Wong said...

One of the best places to visit is Salem, Massachusetts!!! The visitor's center has so many history and historical fiction books about its history. There are a lot of old dark brown houses too. I only had a day but I could have easily spent a week and maybe $300 on books! One of my ancestors was unfortunately a witness at a witches trial! I loved that place. If you live in that area, please don't pass it up.

I am slowly reading (tiny print) We Were Strangers Once by Betsy Carter, love it so far. Also, I have started Chasing King's Killer by
James L. Swanson. Small print but loads of photos. It is very well researched,there is a big section in the back about books to read, chronology, places to visit. I was nine years old when the first attempt on his life was done. Strangely, it was a beautifully dressed mentally disturbed black woman who plunged a sharpened letter opener into his chest. He had a month in a hospital after surgery to recover.

Lesa said...

I'm like you, Gram. I could go back and read the Nero Wolfe mysteries, and probably wouldn't remember them. But, I always liked those books.

Lesa said...

Carol, I've never been to Salem. It sounds as if it's a book trap for a reader! It's easy to get caught up in nonfiction, isn't it?

Fascinating. I didn't know that about the first attempt on King's life.

Abby Miller said...

This week I'm rereading Keeper of the Lost Cities in preparation of the seventh book coming out later this year. Dark Rites sounds like such an interesting read. I hope you enjoy it.

Lesa said...

Abby, I had to look up Keeper of the Lost Cities. I wasn't familiar with the series. Enjoy!