Thursday, April 26, 2018

What Are You Reading?

Let's talk about what we're reading this week, or in my case, not only what I'm reading, but what I bought and hope to read.

I bought two books recently. I'm reading Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Broadway Revolution by Todd S. Purdum. You won't see a review for quite a while. The book has 400 pages and I only read it in between mysteries that I've reviewing. But, this one hits home for my love of Broadway, musical theater, and biography. So, someday I may finish it.

I also bought a book that I could have read from the library. In fact, I checked it out once, and realized there were too many people waiting for it, so I returned it. Then, with yesterday's arrest of a suspect accused of being the "Golden State Killer", I just went ahead and ordered I'll be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara. I know the holds list is only going to get longer on that one.

What are you reading or listening to this week? I hope you've found something of interest.

28 comments:

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Too much! I once again have library books piled up on the shelf and more on the Kindle.

Reading John Scalzi's HEAD ON, the sequel to LOCK IN, as well as his DON'T LIVE FOR YOUR OBITUARY, a collection of his pieces on writing over ten years. Also ALIVE IN SHAPE AND COLOR, edited by Lawrence Block, the second collection of stories inspired by famous paintings, as well as the Kipling collection. Yesterday I read Peter Robinson's SEVEN YEARS, a novella in the Bibliomysteries series. And I have six more mystery or science fiction titles waiting on the shelf.

Sharon said...

I finished HURRICANE SEASON by Lauren K. Denton which I liked very much.

I am halfway through THE GOOD PILOT PETER WOODHOUSE by Alexander McCall Smith. It is a quiet endearing read.

SandyG265 said...

I finished

SHOT IN THE DARK by Cleo Coyle which I enjoyed

MAGGIE FOR HIRE by Kate Darnley, the first in an urban fantasy series was a quick read but didn’t have a lot of depth

And I read one non-fiction book, ICED IN TEN DAYS TRAPPED ON THE EDGE OF ANTARTICA by Chris Turney which would have been a much better book if he stuck to telling the story of his expedition instead of going back and forth between the modern day expedition and Ernest Shackleton’s expedition that was also trapped in the ice. The juxtaposition makes their modern day problem seem like more of an inconvenience in comparison.

I’m not sure what I’m going to start next. I have a large pile of library books to choose from

Liz said...

Just started Speaking in Bones by Kathy Reichs

Lesa said...

Oh, gosh. I'm always behind, Jeff. I haven't read Locked In yet, although I like Scalzi. And I have his book of essays on my Kindle, which I seldom look at. So, you're right. Too much!

Lesa said...

I always wonder about McCall Smith's "other" books, Sharon. I'm glad you're enjoying it.

Lesa said...

I thought that was one of the most interesting Cleo Coyle books, Sandy. I like your comment about Turney's style, that his expedition's problem just sounded like an inconvenience compared to Shackleton's.

Lesa said...

Ah, enjoy Kathy Reichs' book, Liz!

Charlotte said...

I finished:

The Anonymous Source ( An Alex Vance Media Thriller ( book 1) by A C Fuller

Reading now:

The Cutline by A.C. Fuller. The author sent me this free ebook when I signed up for his newsletter. It is a novella featuring Alex Vance two years before the events in The Anonymous Source. I already have the ebook number 2 downloaded. It will have to wait. I have three library books checked out by Bill Crider that I need to start today. They are due back tomorrow. I will renew them, hopefully I will be able to if no one has a hold on them. So many books to read and I find that there is no way to get to them all since I keep adding to the stack.

I enjoy reading what everyone shares here each week. It is fun looking up new books and authors and picking out what I might enjoy in the future. Thank you for your contribution to my addiction of 📚📚📚
Lesa, it is all possible because you give us this day to share with each other. 👏🏻


May all your reading bring pleasure to you this week.
📚📚📚☕️
.

Trisha said...

Work has been stressful so I have been reading a lot. This week's load is heavy on books about running since I have my first half-marathon ever on Sunday. I finished Deena Kastor's Let Your Mind Run, which I loved. I semi-skimmed Run Like A Mother because I love Train Like a Mother.

On the mystery front I am reading "Crooked Heart" by Christina Summers, which is set in my area. I found it on a list of clerical sleuths, which was fun. I am finding the similarities between this and the Julia Spencer-Fleming novels a bit distracting though. A woman Episcopal priest and a married chief of police. The wives' names might even be the same, for sure they both begin with L.

I also read Evenings at Five, a lovely book about grief by Gail Godwin.

Margie Bunting said...

I, too, read Cleo Coyle's Shot in the Dark this week! This series is comfort food for me, and I wasn't disappointed.

I also read Kate White's latest, Even If It Kills Her, part of her Bailey Weggins series. In this one, Bailey may have bitten off more than she can chew when she agrees to help a college friend identify the person who killed her parents and siblings 16 years earlier, as the deceased convicted killer has now been proven not guilty. There seem to be a lot of suspects, all with different motives (of course). I have enjoyed White's two most recent books, including this one, a lot more than those she wrote in the past, so I'm, in for the next one.

Lesa, you reviewed Annette Dashofy's current book and I'd been hearing good things about this series featuring a female EMT in rural Pennsylvania, so I decided to start with the first, Circle of Influence, which I downloaded on my Kindle. It's definitely grittier than a cozy, although it's not the protagonist but her potential boyfriend who is in law enforcement--so let's call it a traditional mystery. There's lots of suspense when a universally disliked local politician appears to have killed a fellow politician and is soon killed himself. Families are tragically affected, and the EMT has a history with both of the politicians that involves her as well, as she tries to help solve the mystery. It left me thrilled that there are five more books in the series, and I have already downloaded the second one on Kindle. For some reason, both of the libraries I patronize have no books by this author.

Lesa said...

Charlotte, You can really pat yourselves on the back & thank Jeff. You're the ones who continue to talk about books, and Jeff's the one who reminded me I hadn't asked you what you were all reading while he also said he enjoyed it. All reasons to make this a regular feature. You're welcome, but you're the ones who keep it going. Hugs, & happy reading, Charlotte!

Lesa said...

Trisha, That would be distracting when you're so familiar with one author's books & the next series has the same template. Hard to get past that.

Lesa said...

Margie, I can answer your question about Annette Dashofy's books, and public libraries. Many libraries buy all of their books through several large vendors, Baker & Taylor or Ingram or Brodart. I can't speak for Ingram or Brodart, but Dashofy is one of a growing number of authors who write interesting mysteries, sometimes with a touch of humor, and publish them with Henery Press. Henery Press is a small publisher. I've mailed them, and other librarians have also complained to them. They don't work with Baker & Taylor because the terms are expensive for a small press. I can understand that with a small publisher, but it cuts them out of a number of the library markets. Unfortunately, that also means some libraries can never order from Henery Press because they must go through their jobber. Your libraries may be ones that have to go through a jobber that doesn't have a contract with Henery Press.

SandyG265 said...

Margie,

My library has Annette Dashofy’s books because I put in a purchase request every time a new one comes out. It takes them a while to get them in though. I know the library has an Amazon account they use to order things for craft programs so they may get her books that way.

DJ said...

Finally finished Elizabeth George’s The Punishment She Deserves. It is 700 pages and could definitely use some editing. However, very well written and I always enjoy spending time with Havers and Lindley. I’ll just have to be patient for the next installment in 2 years.

Currently reading Magpie Murders. So far so good. Not great yet.

Lesa said...

Sandy, We do use Amazon once in a while at our library, but some libraries are only allowed to use certain vendors. At least, that's what the librarian said who was sitting with me at a mystery breakfast, telling every one of the Henery Press authors that she wasn't allowed to order their books.

Lesa said...

DJ, I have to admire you for getting through 700 pages. Good for you!

Glen Davis said...

I read Bad Company by Jack Higgins. where Nazis and Islamists team up to destroy the heroes.

Blood is the Sky by Steve Hamilton, Alex McKnight, guilt ridden over watching The Lone Ranger as a kid, helps his Native American friend try to find his brother. They both get lost in the woods.

Lean Mean Thirteen by Janet Evanovich...Why does a Navy SEAL have the nickname "Ranger?" After reading this, I can see why the mob runs Jersey.

Tsar by Ted Bell, Alex Hawke goes up against a Russian oligarch.

Due Diligence by Owen Parr, Cuba is laundering money through Wall Street (is anyone surprised?) and trying to assassinate then candidate George W. Bush. A Cuban alpha group type guy has to stop them. Reminiscent of Howard Hunt's books on the subject.

Nan1 said...

I am listening to an old Margery Allingham book - The Fashion in Shrouds. It's a good old story, but oh, the racism, the sexism, the privilege...written in 1938. I struggle when I listen to books, and for some reason, these Albert Campion books work well for listening. I am also trying to listen to Y is for Yesterday by Sue Grafton, but it's not going so well.

I just finished reading Blood Foam by Brendan DuBois, an author I had not heard of before but he had been recommended. This book is well into the series, but our library system only has this one and the next. I'm not sure I liked it well enough to buy any of the older books.

Gram said...

I just started The War Bride's Scrapbook by Caroline Preston..a WW2 story told through the pages of a scrapbook. The Grave's a Fine and Private Place by Alan Bradley - Flavia de Luce! and finishing a couple of other books.

Margie Bunting said...

Thank you, Lesa and Sandy, for the information about libraries and Henery Press. I have requested that our library purchase a couple of books, and they have done so. But in this case, I'm not sure if it will work. However, I'll give it a try if I like the second book as much as the first.

Carol N Wong said...

I took the challenge to read 120 books this years, only have 33 so far. Currently, I have started The Celebration by Wanda Brumsstter which is in wonder large print (Amish fiction. Aso I am almoat halfway through a book that have been on my bookshelf for about 5 years, The Swiss Courier by Tricia Goyer. It set during WWII. I am learning about the leaders of the OSS.

Lesa said...

Glen! I just laugh at your comments. "They both get lost in the woods." Thank you for succinct, funny annotations.

Lesa said...

Nan, I just read the new Brendan DuBois. I liked it, but it didn't make me head to the library to get the backlist.

Lesa said...

Gram, I'll be interested to see if you liked The War Bride's Scrapbook.

Lesa said...

Good luck, Margie! We'll see what happens.

Lesa said...

It's nice to mix it up a little, isn't it, Carol?