Thursday, January 19, 2017

What Are You Reading?

The weekly question is a day late, but I wanted to participate, and until yesterday, I was reading for journal reviews. Now, I'm reading something I can share.

I'm reading Larry D. Sweazy's latest novel, Where I Can See You. Hud Matthews returns to his hometown as a police detective after a twenty year absence. Within a few days on the job, there's a young woman found murdered, unusual for the lakeside community. While Hud searches for a killer, he also discovers memories and searches for his own answers. What happened to his mother when she disappeared when Hud was eight years old?

So, what are you reading this week? Some of you will have to speak up because Jeff may not be participating while he's in Florida. I'm eager to see what you're reading.

19 comments:

Grace Koshida said...

I am reading these two books today and tomorrow since they are library books with a lot of user holds: TURBO TWENTY-THREE by Janet Evanovich and NIGHT SCHOOL by Lee Child. After that, I will be reading the first book in CATHY ACE's WISE Enquiries Agency series, THE CASE OF THE MISSING MORRIS DANCER.

Charlotte said...

I am reading my fifth book Blood Lines written by Angela MarsonsI started on the first one December 28, 2016 not sure how many she has written. Need to check on that. I put a hold on Gallows View by Peter Robinson sometime in 2016 at my library. It just came the other day. I haven't ever had to wait for a book this long. I started reading it late yesterday. Haven't read enough at this time to know if I will like it or not.
Lesa, the one you are reading sounds good. Will have to check it out.

Kay said...

WHERE I CAN SEE YOU sounds really good. I'll have to look for it. I'm reading Donis Casey's new Alafair Tucker book - THE RETURN OF THE RAVEN MOCKER. And I just finished her previous book - ALL MEN FEAR ME. I love this series so much. ALL MEN FEAR ME had so much info about homefront during WWI. And the Raven Mocker book is concerned with the 1918 flu epidemic. Having had the flu since Christmas, it appealed to me. LOL

Oh, and I'm listening to REDEMPTION ROAD by John Hart for mystery group in February. Wow. His writing is so descriptive and beautiful. The story is something else. He's reminding me of Greg Iles and Pat Conroy.

SandyG265 said...

I'm reading a ghost story, Dusk or Dark or Dawn or Day by Seanan McGuire.

Lesa said...

Grace, I understand those demands at the library. Takes precedence over the TBR pile of owned books.

Lesa said...

Charlotte, I'm only about 50 pages in, but I like Larry's writing. Peter Robinson must be quite popular at your library!

Lesa said...

Kay, I had to order Donis' new book. I waited because I couldn't remember if I had already ordered it or not from Poisoned Pen. (geez) Just shows you how many books I have that I couldn't remember that. Hope you're on the mend!

Lesa said...

Quite a title on that ghost story, Sandy.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I started to comment but we had to go shopping to stock up. We are here now and once we finish getting everything set I will finally have time to read.

I was reading EMERALD CITY by Jennifer Egan on the road, a short story collection I should finish today. Also started THE DEVIL IN HER WAY by Bill Loehfelm, a mystery set in New Orleans, and the library has a copy of AFTER THE STORM by Linda Castillo.

Charlotte said...

Lesa, The library in my town has really gone down the tube. I can never get what I want from it. Every book has to come from another library in our state. The Peter Robinson book came from a library 223 miles away and it was his first book, copyright in 1987, not a new book. I placed a hold on it way back in 2016. At least I got it. He is a new author for me.

Margie Bunting said...

I'm currently reading Lethal Treasures by Jane K. Cleland, as well as The Wonder Weeks--so that I can keep up with our infant grandson's expected development (fussy periods, growth spurts, etc.).

Cyranetta said...

Daytime - The Face of Britain:a history of the nation through its portraits by Simon Schama. After seeing documentaries by Schama on PBS, I happily read anything by him as well.

Just-before-bed reading - The Crystal Gryphon trilogy by Andre Norton. Someone on a blog was reviewing old favorites, and it reminded me that I hadn't reread Norton for a while - now so long that it's like a new read.

Karen Reittinger said...

I'm a little late to the party. I'm reading THE WATER RAT OF WANCHAI by Ian Hamilton. I like the series. Which I learned about here. :)

Lesa said...

No one is late to the party! It's great to see what you're reading no matter when you post, and no matter when I read it. Jeff, I'm glad you made it safely. Charlotte, I'm so sorry about your library. That's so sad. Ah, memories, right, Margie? Sometimes those old reads are comfort reads, aren't they, Cyranetta? Karen! Thank you.

Patricia Stoltey said...

I shifted to non-fiction for the last two reads. First "Deep Work" by Cal Newport, a great book for everyone who needs to learn focus for their chosen jobs. Now I'm reading "Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End" by Atul Gawande. Next up is fiction: Coconut Cowboy by Tim Dorsey.

Melissa Craig said...


I'm reading LORD JOHN AND THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE BLADE by Diana Gabaldon. I discovered the Outlander series fairly recently, not long before the series started on STARZ. I've had the pleasure of reading the series and associated short stories and novels per her list of 'mostly chronological.' I've especially enjoyed all of the historical detail she includes. I also just finished TURBO TWENTY-THREE by Janet Evanovich. Her work is always a fast and fun read. It's probably when I laugh out loud the most when reading!

Hammed said...

i'm reading a ghost story,since this two book are library book and lot user hold and keep on update.
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Sandie Herron said...

I'm reading the audiobook for Miranda James's (Dean James) CLASSIFIED AS MURDER. Now this is just the second book of his I'm reading, but I thought they'd have a bit more pizzaz in them. They, so far, have been steady moving, proper, and I guess more toward the traditional mystery. Enjoyable, yes. Just unlike anything I've read for a while. As I think about it, I suppose that's not a fair judgment of his book since I've read the entire Joe Grey series by Shirley Rousseau Murphy recently! I've become familiar with and fond of the entire "cast". I'll have to be a bit more open.
Sandie

Deb said...

I’m reading two non-fiction books that happened to show up on my library list simultaneously; both of them deal with different aspects of how the science of Home Economics was used during the Depression to make every penny stretch:

A SQUARE MEAL: A CULINARY HISTORY OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION by Jane Ziegelman and Andrew Coe. The book starts in the years after WWI when food being eaten by the urban/immigrant population began to evolve away from “traditional” rural/farm cooking. Then it follows into the 1930s when hunger and need swept the country. A well-written book–but disheartening in that you read the same political jeremiads against extending any assistance to the “undeserving poor” 80 years ago that we hear today. Sigh.

THE LOST ART OF DRESS: THE WOMEN WHO ONCE MADE AMERICA STYLISH by Linda Przybyszewski. I think I may have seen a reference to this book right here on your blog. It focuses on the “Dress Doctors” of the first half of the 20th century who gave women guidance, advice, and patterns when it came to sewing one'S wardrobe. The book is full of lovely illustrations and highlights a forgotten aspect of mid-century domestic history, but I’m not sure I care for its disdain for the ready-to-wear and more inclusive fashions of the 1960s and beyond.