Wednesday, December 28, 2016

What Are You Reading?

I actually do have a reason that I haven't posted a book review, although I did read several books over the holidays. But, I'll save that for tomorrow.

Today, I wanted to find out what you're reading now, and what you found time to read over the holidays. I'm just starting Anne Perry's new book, Murder on the Serpentine. It's due out in March, and, it's the final book in the Charlotte and Thomas Pitt series, as we know it. Perry is going to jump ahead to 1910 with a new generation in the next book. I guess, I could have even put that news under "Have You Heard?"

In the meantime, tell me about your books. What have you read or listened to? Or, what books did you get as presents? Would you share and tell all of us?

19 comments:

SandyG265 said...

I'm reading a nonfiction book, Eight Flavors the untold story of American cuisine by Sarah Lehman. It's actually pretty interesting. Each chapter is about a different flare like garlic or soy sauce and how it became popular in American cooking.

Lesa said...

It sounds interesting, Sandy.

Kay said...

I had not 'heard' that about the Perry book. Wow. You know, it makes me want to go back and reread all the Pitt books. I know. A lot of them. I've been slowly rereading Deborah Crombie's series in preparation for the new one next month. Or rather, I've been listening to them. I had a friend in my mystery group who reread all of Louise Penny's books before reading A GREAT RECKONING.

As to what else I've been reading - RIVER ROAD by Carol Goodman (audio right now) and NOT MY DAUGHTER by Barbara Delinsky in print. That latter is an older one, but I've been branching out into some other fiction trails as I've gotten a little weary of the psychological thrillers. I love them, but am getting to the point that I can guess the solution or killer or whatnot way too early. LOL

Bill Crider said...

Currently reading an ARC of Joe Lansdale's BLOOD AND LEMONADE.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I just finished Olen Steinhauer's THE TOURIST, first in his Milo Weaver (CIA) trilogy. I've enjoyed a couple of his others and really liked his (created) series BERLIN STATION on Epix.

Now reading another spy story (which I don't usually do, but this is another library downloaded due back soon, so), this one British - Mick Herron's SLOW HORSES, first in his Slough House/Jackson Lamb series, about disgraced spies who are sidelined in the title "house" for various offenses, like getting 120 people blown up by terrorists in the Underground. (Yes, it was a test and they weren't really killed, but still.)

After reading a second Howard Waldrop collection I am trying to decide what short stories to read next. I'm reading the huge collection LADY ON THE CASE: 22 Female Detective Stories, edited by Marcia Muller & Bill Pronzini.

And I've gone back to I'M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS by Iain Reid.

Whew.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

I never read any of the Pitt books, though I did read the first half dozen of her William Monk series, set earlier in the 19th Century.

Charlotte said...

Last night I finished reading Cereal Murders by Diane Mott Davidson. This is the first book I have read written by her.
I did receive two new books for Christmas.
The Lake House by Kate Morton. I have read her other books and have enjoyed all of them.
Brain on Fire by Susannah Catalan. New author for me. One of my grandsons who is eighteen picked out this book for me. How sweet is that. He also got me a coffee mug. Two of my favorite things to receive at anytime. He has always been a good shopper and picked out great gifts for me. So special.
I trust everyone had a wonderful Christmas and received some new books to add to your stacks of other books. You can never have enough.🤗📚📚❤️

Lesa said...

Well, Charlotte. My mother would look at all my books, and say, "Enough, already!" Isn't it wonderful to have a good gift giver in the family?

Lesa said...

I love to hear what everyone is reading. Thanks for sharing!

Karen Reittinger said...

Today I'm reading THE NEVER-OPEN DESERT DINER by James Anderson and SMOKE GETS IN YOUR EYES by Caitlin Doughty. THE NEVER-OPEN DESERT DINER is wonderful.

Sharon said...

I am reading Curried Away by Gail Oust.

Margie Bunting said...

I'm currently reading Gigi Pandian's MICHELANGELO'S GHOST, latest in her Jaya Jones Treasure Hunt series, which is fantastic. Gigi just told me (for the Sisters in Crime Norcal newsletter) that this book was named a top 10 2016 mystery by Suspense Magazine. It's a terrific series, as is her Accidental Alchemist series. Before that, I finally read Anne Cleeland's MURDER IN HINDSIGHT, so I'm up to date on the Acton and Doyle series before the next one is released. I've also recently read and enjoyed ILL MET BY MURDER by Elizabeth J. Duncan, PROSE and CONS by Amanda flower, PLAID AND PLAGIARISM by Molly MacRae, GIRL WAITS WITH GUN by Amy Stewart, and JUST ONE DAMNED THING AFTER ANOTHER by Jodi Taylor. I also have to recommend Bruce Cameron's "Repo" books--quite a different flavor than his dog books. THE MIDNIGHT PLAN OF THE REPO MAN and REPO MADNESS are just delightful. And finally, I have to recommend Lauren Graham's DANCING AS FAST AS I CAN for Gilmore Girls devotees. Although I had never watched one episode of Gilmore Girls, I took it upon myself to watch all 7 seasons on Netflix so I could watch the four new episodes. Loved the regular seasons, not so much the new ones, but it was a kick reading Lauren Graham's take on both and on other things she has done in show biz.

Lesa said...

I hear great things about The Never-Open Desert Diner from my friend Kaye.

And, Margie? The next Doyle & Acton - Murder in Containment is already out. It came out in October.

Love everyone's descriptions! Thank you!

Deb said...

Despite all the busyness of the Christmas season, I've managed to get a few books in. The following three are highly recommended:

THE TEA PLANTER'S WIFE by Dinah Jefferies. There are shades of REBECCA in this book set in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) in the 1920s. After a whirlwind courtship in London, a young woman marries an older widower and journeys to his tea plantation. But why won't anyone discuss what happened to his first wife? The book is beautifully-written and richly-evocative--you really feel the sensory overload the young wife experiences with all new sights, smells, sounds, and colors of Ceylon. If I have one quibble with the book (MILD SPOILER), it's that the second half of the book depends on a plot point that seemed to me genetically impossible; but the writing was so beautiful, I stayed with it.

THE MOTH CATCHER by Ann Cleeves. The latest Vera Stanhope police procedural. A solid story with a diverse group of characters involving the seemingly unconnected murders of two people who both just happened to be moth collectors.

ALL THINGS CEASE TO APPEAR by Elizabeth Brundage. When I checked out this book, I knew nothing beyond the dust cover blurb: a man returns home from work and finds his wife murdered and their young daughter alone in the house. I thought it would be a who-dunnit or a why-dunnit. I wasn't expecting such a complex, layered story involving many characters over many decades. Brundage does a marvelous job of interweaving the various plot strands and time-frames (although one minor anachronism--a character wearing a Guns 'n' Roses t-shirt in 1978, I think not--bothered me more than it should). An engrossing read; well worth your time.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Well, sure, Deb. Even I know they formed in 1985. (I know it because I looked it up just this minute. The author should have done the same.)

Deb said...

Being a former Disco Dolly and Reagan-era Go-Go Girl, my knowledge of 1970s and 1980s pop culture is pretty comprehensive, and as soon as I read the sentence, "She was wearing a Guns & Roses tee-shirt," I said aloud, "Not in 1978 she wasn't!" But I have to stress that the book is really good--it's just that anachronisms (when I recognize them, of course) take me right out of the story.

Lesa said...

Thank you, Deb. I appreciate your complete summaries, along with the note about the anachronism. I'm afraid I never would have noticed. But, I love it when people do!

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

The worst I remember - sorry, but I can't recall which book it was exactly - was in a late book by Evan Hunter/Ed McBain. His narrator returns several times in the book to the key moment that shaped his life (he believes), the day his birthday was ruined by the assassination of JFK, on November 21, 1963. He repeats this several times, stating how November 21 is ruined for him forever, and no one - the editor (if there was one) or anyone else at his publisher, either knew or pointed out that it was November TWENTY-SECOND!

That would be like confusing 9/11 with 9/10.

sg911911 said...

I'm reading Death of a Toy Soldier by Barbara Early which I read about on this blog. Not bad so far.