Wednesday, July 20, 2016

What Are You Reading?

Are you reading, or are you glued to your TV? I'll be honest and say I can't watch. But, don't worry. I'll definitely vote in November.

That really means I have time to read in the evening. I'm halfway through Ruth Ware's new novel, The Woman in Cabin 10.  Don't believe a word you heard about this being like an Agatha Christie novel. With the pace and intensity, I'm sure I'll finish the book today, and have a review up tomorrow.

What book is tearing you away from television?

15 comments:

Grace Koshida said...

I am just starting to read one of books you posted a while ago: "Once A Crooked Man" by David McCallum. I loved watching him in both The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and NCIS. Who knew that he had ambitions to be a novelist?!

Living in Canada, I try not to watch much about the nominee process, but it is hard to avoid. Cleveland has made the Canadian news every day so far, and we can get a live feed of what's happening at the RNC too on our political channel! Will of course be interested in November's result since we have such close relations with the US.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

No, not watching (though Jackie is). I won't even comment on that. Too upsetting.

Reading? Well, let's see. There is PULP INK, an ebook of stories edited by Nigel Bird & Chris Rhatigan. There is (a library book downloaded to the Kindle) Maeve Brennan's reprinted THE LONG-WINDED LADY: Notes From The New Yorker, a series of short pieces about New York she did for the magazine that you would find fascinating, I'm sure. I will probably read the new Marcia Muller/Sharon McCone book (SOMEONE ALWAYS KNOWS) as soon as I pick it up from the library. This is good as I've been having a tough time deciding what to read next.

Lesa said...

Grace, I'm sure the news is hard to avoid.

Isn't it great to see someone as talented as David McCallum still have ambitions in another direction?

Lesa said...

Sometimes, it's just hard to find a book to fit, isn't it, Jeff? Thanks for the note about the book about New York. I'll have to check on it. Good luck finding the next book!

Carol N Wong said...

Will be watching both conventions, ready to vote, made up my mind a long time ago. I have been reading during the some of the commentary and a few of the speeches.

Just started Bev by Andrea Williams and Matty Rich, a white woman who was involved in registering black voters in the deep South. Very interesting, I was working long hours then so I missed a lo

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Just saw that I have three books waiting to be picked up: the Marcia Muller, the new James Sallis book (yay!), WILLNOT, and another I can't remember, so, it's all good. And I will be getting the next (#5) in the Linda Castillo series soon, so thanks again for recommending that.

Carol M said...

Like you, I'm not watching the conventions but I will definitely vote in November!

I'm trying to work on my TBR pile so I pulled a copy of Deadly Gift by Heather Graham. The Woman in Cabin 10 sounds really good! It's on my list!

SandyG265 said...

I've been watching the Toir de France. I've been having trouble finding anything I want to read at the library so I'm re-reading The Gargoyle Gets His Girl by Kristen Painter. It's light reading and funny.

Deb said...

I'm voting and absolutely nothing that happens at this convention will change my mind about my choice so why watch and raise my blood pressure unnecessarily?

I just got a call from the library that some books I requested are in: HONEY AND TEA and MRS. WESTERBY by Elizabeth Cadell, a mid-century English writer who specialized in Gothics and romance novels. Also in, Susan Hill's THE WOMAN IN BLACK. I have read all of Hill's Detective Simon Serailler mysteries (I'm more interested in the way the characters interact and evolve than in the mysteries themselves, which are generally pretty easy to solve), but I didn't know she was the author of HOWARD'S END IS ON THE LANDING or of THE WOMAN IN BLACK, possibly her most famous work.

Deb said...

By the way, I read Ruth Ware's debut novel, IN A DARK, DARK WOOD, which I thought had an interesting premise but needed at least one more go-round with an editor--the villain was immediately obvious and there was too much business involving cell phones and texting and people using each other's phones. I've read some good reviews for Ware's new book (and her first book showed she's good at creating a mood), but I hope it's a little more finely-crafted than her first.

Glen Davis said...

I'm reading The Chase by Clive Cussler. First in the Isaac Bell series.

A reversal of his usual MO of a lead in set in the past featuring some sort of artifact, followed by a story involving the discovery of said artifact.

This one leads with the discovery of an artifact, and followed by a story of how the artifact ended up where it was found.

Not bad, very dime novel-esque in style, though.

Lesa said...

Deb, I'll be interested to hear what you think if you read The Woman in Cabin 10. I didn't read the earlier one, so I don't know.

Jeff, you're welcome about the Linda Castillo. Very good book!

Sounds like a number of us just can't settle into a book, or haven't found a good one. Wishing everyone better reading soon!

Patricia Stoltey said...

I'm doing a little of both. I'm kind of a political science junkie so watch most of both conventions for the fun and drama. I'm reading "The Painful Truth: What Chronic Pain Is Really Like and Why It Matters to Each of Us" by Lynn R. Webster.

Nann said...

The ARC of The Woman in Cabin 10 is in the still-too-high stack -- thanks for the reminder, Lesa. Maybe I'll read that next.

Lesa said...

Thanks, Patricia & Nann. I hope you enjoy it, Nann!